Podnutz Daily #487 – Paul Joyner from Sysadmin Today

A Show for Computer Repair Techs by Computer Repair Techs Jeff Halash from TechNutPC.com Talks to Computer Technicians Google+ Jeffery Halash Twitter: TechNutPC Email: PodnutzDaily@Podnutz.com Paul Joyner from Sysadmin Today Links: Sysadmin Today Podcast Call that Girl episode featuring Sysadmin Today. Sign up to be a guest on The Computer Repair Podcast or Podnutz Daily by sending an E-Mail to Guest@Podnutz.com Show Sponsors: Try Instant Housecall Today for Free/Offer Code: Podnutz Read more here:: Podnutz Daily #487 – Paul Joyner from Sysadmin Today...

Podnutz Daily #486 – Brian Best from BestMacs

A Show for Computer Repair Techs by Computer Repair Techs Jeff Halash from TechNutPC.com Talks to Computer Technicians Google+ Jeffery Halash Twitter: TechNutPC Email: PodnutzDaily@Podnutz.com Brian Best from BestMacs Sign up to be a guest on The Computer Repair Podcast or Podnutz Daily by sending an E-Mail to Guest@Podnutz.com Show Sponsors: Try Instant Housecall Today for Free/Offer Code: Podnutz Read more here:: Podnutz Daily #486 – Brian Best from BestMacs...
Samsung’s Doomed Note7 Gets a Second Life as the Fan Edition

Samsung’s Doomed Note7 Gets a Second Life as the Fan Edition

Almost a year after the first fateful reports of the flame-happy Galaxy Note7, the Samsung Galaxy Note “Fan Edition” has just made its redux debut. And in case you were wondering—no, there isn’t a tiny fan in there to help prevent battery fires. (We checked.) The reissued Fan Edition phone is a response to the outcry over the forced recall of these well-reviewed (if dangerous) phones. Before they started exploding, people really liked the Note7. And lots of owners didn’t want to settle for pen-less phone alternatives. Environmental activists, like Greenpeace, also decried the idea of millions of brand-new phones (along with all the energy and resources it took to make them) being destroyed as part of the recall—and they put pressure on Samsung to deal with the recalled phones responsibly. In response to one—or both—of these groups, Samsung refurbished and reissued the 2016 Note under the Fan Edition (FE) branding (conspicuously leaving the Note7 name out of promotion and labeling). Naturally, we got our hands on one and tore it down. Salvaging the Note7 The “Fan Edition” is only available in South Korea so far—though it could be poised for a larger comeback. But only if Samsung has truly ironed out the issues that doomed the Note7 to its explosively short shelf life. In the case of the Note7’s exploding battery, the problem was two-fold and occurred in two separately-sourced batches of batteries. Wired’s Tim Moynihan explains: In the case of batteries sourced from Samsung SDI, there wasn’t enough room between the heat-sealed protective pouch around the battery and its internals. In the worst scenarios, that caused electrodes...
Keep the Internet Weird: Save Net Neutrality

Keep the Internet Weird: Save Net Neutrality

The internet is a pretty neat place. Sure—sometimes it gets a little weird, but it’s usually weird in a wonderful way. The internet taught me how to play guitar. The internet never fails to comfort me with Harry Potter fan videos when I’m in need of a smile. And when the people of the Internet come together, we can do wonderful things. Because of wonderful netizens like you, iFixit was able to help almost 100 million people fix their things just last year. The internet makes our lives better—and it’s a real shame that it’s under attack. Right now, the internet is facing one of the greatest threats in its history. The Federal Communications Commision (FCC) is on the brink of giving companies like Comcast and Verizon control over what we can see and do on the internet. If they win, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) will have the power to throttle, block, censor, and charge whatever they darn well please. Which means we could soon be faced with an internet that forces some of our favorite websites into the slowlane. Or worse, charges a hefty premium to access them. Or worse-worse, blocks them altogether. Meanwhile, companies with deep pockets could be given special VIP internet prioritization—tilting the odds ever in their favor. Apparently money talks. But then again, so do we. The internet belongs to all of us, and today, we’re fighting back! iFixit is proud to stand in solidarity with our fellow netizens to fight for an equal internet. We will sound the alarm against the FCC. And we will prove that if we stand together, we can...

Podnutz Daily #485 – Kenneth Litzsey from Litzsey Tech Services

A Show for Computer Repair Techs by Computer Repair Techs Jeff Halash from TechNutPC.com Talks to Computer Technicians Google+ Jeffery Halash Twitter: TechNutPC Email: PodnutzDaily@Podnutz.com Kenneth Litzsey from Litzsey Tech Services A long-time techie that decided to strike out on my own 4 years ago to start my own IT company. I’m a one-man IT shop that is looking to partner with likeminded people with skill sets outside my own to provide service for small businesses. I am part of the Commercial Avenue Development Mission http://southchicagochamber.org/commercial-avenue-development/ Sign up to be a guest on The Computer Repair Podcast or Podnutz Daily by sending an E-Mail to Guest@Podnutz.com Show Sponsors: Try Instant Housecall Today for Free/Offer Code: Podnutz Read more here:: Podnutz Daily #485 – Kenneth Litzsey from Litzsey Tech Services...
Take a Stand Against DRM

Take a Stand Against DRM

Today, is the International Day Against DRM, which means it’s time for your friendly, annual reminder: DRM sucks—it throttles property rights, turns owners into criminals, and artificially limits the usefulness of your stuff. So join us in taking a stand against DRM, and the corporate overreaching it stands for. What is DRM? Even if you’ve never heard of it, you’ve probably encountered DRM before. DRM is the reason you can’t take ebooks with you to another e-reader. It’s the reason why you can’t watch some digital movies you buy on “unapproved” devices. It’s the reason you can’t watch an out-of-region DVD on your laptop. DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, though it would be more accurate to call it “digital restrictions management.” Because, as the Free Software Foundation explains, DRM is “the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media.” So, generally speaking DRM is handcuffs for your digital stuff. As digital activist and sci-fi writer Cory Doctorow puts it: “Anytime someone puts a lock on something that belongs to you and won’t give you the key, it’s not there for your benefit.” Defenders of DRM will tell you that those handcuffs protect digital content—like music, games, and movies—from being illegally copied and pirated. But DRM doesn’t actually do a good job of stopping piracy. Instead, it does a great job at policing the way legitimate owners use their stuff. “Users may be forced to use certain hardware or software platforms, limited to accessing their media on a predetermined number of devices, […] unable to use accessibility software such as screen readers, cut...