Feast Your Eyes on the Xbox One X Teardown

Feast Your Eyes on the Xbox One X Teardown

Microsoft is calling their new Xbox One X “the world’s most powerful console,” promising smoother gameplay, bigger worlds, and more details than ever before. And with an understated all-black case, the One X sets a strikingly different tone from the Xbox One S we tore down back in August of 2016. But, as you know, for us—it’s what’s inside the box that counts. So we performed a video teardown of the Xbox One X. They may be different on the outside, but the Xbox One X clearly shows a family resemblance to the One S when it comes to construction. Like the S, the One X is extremely easy to disassemble. In fact, it only uses two types of screws throughout, has labeled, modular components, and (once you get past a few clips) the external case slides right off. Easy-peasy. Once inside, we spied the One X’s 1TB Seagate Drive, the upgraded 245-watt power supply, the Scorpio Engine SoC, and the Vapor Chamber Heat Sink—among other things. We also spotted a familiar face helmet: Master Chief! It appears Microsoft continued the tradition of including Master Chief inside the console as a little Easter Egg for hardware explorers like us. In the Xbox One S, we found him striding across an optical disc drive bracket. Here, Master Chief is galloping across the circuit board astride a scorpion. We forgot to include Master Chief in the video teardown, so here’s a quick shot of him. The Verge explains: “The image is [a] nice homage both to the character that helped propel the Xbox to success and to the One X’s code...
Show Off the Inside of Your iPhone X with These Wallpapers

Show Off the Inside of Your iPhone X with These Wallpapers

We’ve just finished up with our iPhone X teardown (and what a teardown it was)—which means there’s only one item left on our teardown check-list: iPhone X wallpapers. Every year, we cap off our teardown extravaganza by releasing wallpapers that show off the sweet internals of your iPhone. Apple spent too much effort on the iPhone X’s hardware to cover it up with glass that you can’t even see through. If you’re not interested in peeling up the OLED screen with a Suction Handle, like we do, then a wallpaper of your iPhone X internals is the next-best, less-destructive thing. With these sweet wallpapers, you can basically pretend you’re looking straight through the screen and into the heart of your phone—like you have X-ray vision. And speaking of X-rays—this year, we’ve two internals options for you: a gorgeous, high-resolution image and an X-ray image of your iPhone X insides. By the way, the edge-to-edge display makes this set of wallpapers especially slick. Here’s how you get yours: For best results, navigate to this blog post on your phone. Find the image you want as your wallpaper and click on the photo for the full resolution. Then, save the image onto your phone. You can set the wallpaper from “Wallpapers” in your phone’s Settings—“Choose a New Wallpaper” lists your recent photos, including downloads. Both “Still” and “Perspective” both work, but I like “Still” a little more. Click the photos below for the full resolution image. iPhone X wallpaper: Click photo for full resolution image: (1125 x 2432) iPhone X … X-ray wallpaper: Click photo for full resolution image: (1125 x...
Teardown: Inside the iPhone X

Teardown: Inside the iPhone X

This is the iPhone that Steve Jobs imagined. He ran out of time to build it, but he built the team that eventually did. We beat the lines in the United States and traveled to Australia to take apart an iPhone X in the future and find out how his vision was finally brought to life. The iPhone X opens from the side just like the 7 and 8—but inside, it’s a whole new ball game. When it comes to hardware, this is the most densely-packed gadget we’ve ever taken apart. Thanks to drastically shrinking the bezels, the iPhone X sports the largest display of any iPhone—in a smaller form factor than the “Plus” devices. That super-sized display needs a super-sized battery, and there wasn’t room with the iPhone’s traditional layout. The solution? An unprecedented degree of miniaturization of the main board. Apple effectively folded the logic board in half—and soldered the layers together—to free up valuable real estate for the Plus-sized battery. In its compact and stacked form, the iPhone X logic board takes up about 70% of the area of the iPhone 8 Plus board. Separated and spread out, the X’s board is actually 35% bigger than the one in the 8 Plus—which leaves plenty of room for new goodies, like hardware to power FaceID. The closest thing we’ve seen to the iPhone X’s stacked logic board is the one we found tearing down the original iPhone. Of course, the new phone’s case—with its metal frame and subtle curves—also pays homage to the original. Ten years of iPhone, one design team. Even after a decade of iteration...
#ScaryRepair Story Contest Winners!

#ScaryRepair Story Contest Winners!

Tonight is All Hallows’ Eve. Thanks to you, we’ve been officially spooked and entirely grossed out. We asked for your scariest repair tales and you delivered—bugs, barf, and a few dead rodents. If you don’t have the heebeegeebees now, you will in a minute. Here are the top three scariest repair stories… 1.) Andre: A customer came into the small computer repair shop where I work saying her cat had vomited on her Retina MacBook Pro and it would no longer turn on. The moment she put her computer on the counter for me to take a look at I could smell the fine aroma. I checked her in, then went to work on it. The moment I pulled the base from the computer I was slammed by a wave of the pungent, nausea-inducing smell. It was so bad that I had to duck my head under my desk to avoid vomiting myself! Once I had gotten myself under control, I went back to the repair. There was green vomit goop jammed through the intake vents, accumulating in the free space between the battery cells. The motherboard somehow managed to avoid all damage, there was only slight corrosion on the I/O board! I cleaned the corrosion and removed all the vestiges of vomit and it only needed a replacement battery! The customer received a fully functional computer that only smelled faintly of cat vomit, and I reaffirmed my belief that cats really do hate MacBooks. 2.) Atilla: In 2014, I was working on an iPad 3 or 4 with the screen completely broken. I didn’t have a heating tool...
Greenpeace Grades Your Smartphone’s Maker on Sustainability

Greenpeace Grades Your Smartphone’s Maker on Sustainability

Greenpeace released its 19th Guide to Greener Electronics, a report that grades companies based on sustainability efforts. And, according to Greenpeace, most of the world’s renowned tech companies—including Samsung, Google, and Apple—have lots of room for improvement when it comes to greener tech. Samsung and Google both earned report cards they’d be ashamed to show their parents. Amazon fared even worse—earning an F for their environmental efforts. Even Apple, which often touts its commitment to sustainability, underperformed—in part, due to the design of their products. While none of the 17 manufacturers that Greenpeace considered in the report managed an A, top-of-the-class honors went to Fairphone—a small Dutch phone-maker that’s committed to building an ethical, modular, repairable phone. As part of the grading process, Greenpeace judged gadget-makers on three areas of environmental impact: Renewable Energy, Hazardous Chemical Elimination, and Sustainable Design. Each area counted for ⅓ of the company’s overall score. For the first time, Greenpeace factored ease-of-disassembly into their metrics for Sustainable Design. As we’ve discussed many times on this blog, devices that are easier to take apart are easier for owners to repair—but they’re also much easier for recyclers to process. Glued-in, integrated batteries pose a significant challenge to most regional e-waste recyclers. Products have to be disassembled, and lithium-ion batteries need to removed before they make their way into shredders. Obviously, batteries that catch fire during disassembly or in a shredder make it a lot harder for local recyclers to do their job. Still, integrated Li-ion batteries are on the rise in most consumer products. To assess ease-of-disassembly and product repairability, Greenpeace sent dozens of products from...
Relive Your Youth With These Vintage Game Console Teardowns

Relive Your Youth With These Vintage Game Console Teardowns

It’s fair to say that my older brothers and I were mischievous kids. We only ever stayed out of trouble for long when we were playing video games—which is probably why my mom didn’t mind dropping a little cash on consoles from time to time. Better your three crazy kids team up to fight monsters in a game than turn their tiny fists on each other in real life. As per the-youngest-sibling tradition, I was always last to get my turn to play. And I didn’t time it, but I’m certain that my brothers’ turns were a lot longer than mine were. Sometimes, my “turn” wasn’t even real—like when they unplugged the controller and told me I was playing Tails in Sonic the Hedgehog. I found out later that Tails is computer-controlled. Still, some of my fondest memories involve being huddled around a console, battling beasts and bosses through the wee hours of the morning. When I got older, my brothers eventually gave me more play-time. They schooled me in the proper multiplayer Super Mario etiquette: I learned how to share items, never to race too far ahead, and how to strategically tag-team an attack on the level-boss. When Madden came out, they humored my efforts to custom-make my entire team: I shrunk half the players and named them after Hobbits; then I made the rest extra-large and named them after other Fellowship members. Sometimes, Mom played with us too. (Don’t tell anyone, but the whole family ate takeout for a few weeks until she mastered the secret shortcut of Rainbow Road in Mario Kart.) Throughout the years, I’ve...